Well, okay, not just any corn on the cob, but “Boulevard Raspail” corn on the cob.

Yeah, I didn’t know what “Boulevard Raspail” meant either. That’s what the internet is for! Although, Dorie does explain it in the introduction to this recipe, which is very, very short in and of itself. This may be the easiest recipe in the book. The ingredients list is certainly brief: corn, butter, salt & pepper.

It seems that while perusing the market on Boulevard Raspail, Dorie came across some ears of corn, a fairly uncommon sight in France. She bought some, and this is how the vendor told her to cook them.

I’ll be honest: I’ve been cooking my corn this way all summer, a tip I picked up on the internet somewhere. It is now my favorite way to cook corn, as it comes out wonderfully tender and delicious. You can eat it the American way by nomming it straight off the cob (which we have done a few times), or you can eat it the French way by cutting off the kernels (which we have also done, the better to add it to salsas, couscous, and taco salads). Actually, I almost always prefer to cut off the kernels. When I was a child, I once lost a loose tooth while biting into a corn cob, and the sensation still haunts me. It’s the same reason I can’t bite into apples unless they’ve been sliced first.

Here is Dorie’s method:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Prep corn by setting it nearby.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Prep corn by setting it nearby.

When the oven is hot, place corn directly on the oven rack. Cook for 20 minutes, turn over, and cook for another 20 minutes.

When the oven is hot, place corn directly on the oven rack. Cook for 20 minutes, turn over, and cook for another 20 minutes.

After the 40 minutes are up, remove corn from the oven and allow to cool until you can handle it without burning yourself.

After the 40 minutes are up, remove corn from the oven and allow to cool until you can handle it without burning yourself.

You can eat the corn right off the cob, or you can have your husband remove the kernels for you. We wanted our corn for tacos, so off those kernels went!

Shuck that corn, silk and all! You can eat the corn right off the cob, or you can have your husband remove the kernels for you. We wanted our corn for tacos, so off those kernels went!

A plate full of pretty, delicious corn kernels. If we hadn't been eating ours with tacos, I would have put it all in a bowl, added some butter, salt, and pepper and called it a side dish.

A plate full of pretty, delicious corn kernels. If we hadn’t been eating ours with tacos, I would have put it all in a bowl, added some butter, salt, and pepper and called it a side dish.

Now, this is very tasty, but I wonder if that can be attributed to the (locally-grown) corn. Either way, this really is the best way to cook corn, in my opinion. We do not have a grill, and I honestly don’t like messing with boiling corn. Besides which, this tastes better. At least, to me it does. And, honestly, it doesn’t bother me to turn on the oven to 400ºF in the middle of summer – I live in Texas. The AC is on constantly anyway. Plus, you get kinda used to it, especially since summer seems to last from about April to October.

So, is this a keeper? Well, I’ve been doing it this way since April, so yeah. It works for me. Half of this corn went into our tacos, and I’m saving the other half for some enchiladas I’m making this weekend. I’ve also mixed it with couscous and lime-flavored olive oil, which was delicious, and I’m sure I’ll be making some tomato and corn salsa with it eventually. I really don’t see any reason to cook it any other way!

To see how the other Doristas dealt with this interesting way to do corn, check out the French Friday links. Happy cooking!

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